La Genovese

La Genovese

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Eggplant a Much Loved Italian vegetable

Eggplant is the stable for many Italian and Italian American households. I have had them filled with ricotta, ricotta and prosciutto, mozzarella, and also chopped meat. Calabrese love eggplant.  The Calabrese cook it in many different. I remember one night instead of having pizza and to make sure that we ate the eggplant in the fridge, Mom cut the eggplants in half, scored the pulp , season with finely chopped garlic, salt, pepper, olive oil, and smeared a thin layer of tomato sauce. Into the oven for about 10 – 15 minutes at 400 degrees. I would also add parmigiana cheese and mozzarella toward the last 4 minutes. The meal was heaven and a wonderful opportunity to savor eggplant in another way!

Enjoy Don’t order pizza tonight, have an eggplant!

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This so traditional and I loved making it with my mother… I make a better crust than she did but the contents of this dish is still Neapolitan

Here is the legend that goes with the Pie:

The Legends. There are different legends about the Origin of the Pastiera, one is that the priestesses of Ceres were celebrating the return of Spring. Another possibility is that they derived from ritual pie at the time of Constantine the Great, they were the offers of the baptismal ritual. But as we know the Pastiera today, it comes from the Monasteries of Naples. It was the symbol of the Resurrection on Easter. Very charming is the legend of the siren Partenope, that since she was enchanted by the beauty of the Gulf of Naples, that established there her home. She used to cheer with beautiful love songs, and one day her voice was so melodious that the residents wanted to thank for her wonderful singing. The seven most beautiful girls were responsible for delivering seven gifts to the beautiful mermaid Partenope. The flour symbol of strength and wealth of the campaign. Ricotta homage of the shepherds and sheep. The egg symbol of life. Wheat flour, boiled in to the milk, a symbol of the two kingdoms of nature. The water of orange flowers, because even the smells of the earth wanted to pay homage. The spices that represented the people far away and finally the sugar, the symbol of the sweetness of her singing in heaven, on earth, and throughout the universe. Partenope was so ‘happy with the gifts that it take them at the foot of the Gods. They were so inebriated by the smells and aromas that they decided to mix and create a dessert worthy of the beauty of the hand of Partenope. So was born the Pastiera.

  • For the Grain:
  • 1 can Cooked Grain ( You can find it in Italian store)
  • 7 oz Sugar
  • 1-1/3 Milk and heavy cream
  • 2 oz Butter unsalted
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori d’Arancio)
  • 2 tbsp Candied Fruit
  • Cook over very low heat for 4 hours, turning often. Cook it the day before because must cool and rested
  • The Filling:
  • 21 oz. Ricotta Cheese (if you can find Sheep) sweet
  • 19 oz. Sugar
  • 5 Eggs + 2 Yolks
  • 2 tbsp Vanilla
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori di Arancio)
  • 2 cups Candied Fruit
  • Pasta Frolla Italian Sweet Pastry Dough:
  • 21 oz. Flour 00 (Cake Flour)
  • 5 oz. Sugar
  • 3 Eggs Yolk
  • 5 oz. Butter
  • 1 pinch of Salt
  • Powdered Sugar

Not done yet:

  1. For the Pasta Frolla:
  2. In the food processor place flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Pulse several times to mix.
  3. Add butter and pulse about 10 times to mix. Add eggs and pulse until dough forms a ball.
  4. Form dough into a ball. Wrap it in plastic wrap and store in the fridge until needed, up to several days.
  5. When ready to use, unwrap it, place it on a lightly floured work surface and knead it until it is soft and malleable.
  6. Sometimes is easier to work on wax paper. In Italy the pastry is used for tarts, cakes and special cakes.
  7. For the Mix:
  8. In a large bowl mix the grain cooked the day before, the sugar with the ricotta, egg yolks, vanilla, lemon and orange extract and the candied fruit.
  9. Whip the egg whites and gently incorporate with a spatula from the bottom upwards.
  10. Roll out the dough with a rolling pin and place it on a buttered and floured baking pan.
  11. Bake for about 50 minutes at 350F. Let cool and dust with powder sugar.

Many like it when it has been cooled in the fridge for a couple of days….

I never liked the candied fruit so mine lacks it in the pie, but I do use it to perfume the milk

I also love to use heavy cream to cut the milk

I will not use margarine…

Do enjoy

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This so traditional and I loved making it with my mother… I make a better crust than she did but the contents of this dish is still Neapoiltan

Here is the legend that goes with the Pie:

he Legends. There are different legends about the Origin of the Pastiera, one is that the priestesses of Ceres were celebrating the return of Spring. Another possibility is that they derived from ritual pie at the time of Constantine the Great, they were the offers of the baptismal ritual. But as we know the Pastiera today, it comes from the Monasteries of Naples. It was the symbol of the Resurrection on Easter. Very charming is the legend of the siren Partenope, that since she was enchanted by the beauty of the Gulf of Naples, that established there her home. She used to cheer with beautiful love songs, and one day her voice was so melodious that the residents wanted to thank for her wonderful singing. The seven most beautiful girls were responsible for delivering seven gifts to the beautiful mermaid Partenope. The flour symbol of strength and wealth of the campaign. Ricotta homage of the shepherds and sheep. The egg symbol of life. Wheat flour, boiled in to the milk, a symbol of the two kingdoms of nature. The water of orange flowers, because even the smells of the earth wanted to pay homage. The spices that represented the people far away and finally the sugar, the symbol of the sweetness of her singing in heaven, on earth, and throughout the universe. Partenope was so ‘happy with the gifts that it take them at the foot of the Gods. They were so inebriated by the smells and aromas that they decided to mix and create a dessert worthy of the beauty of the hand of Partenope. So was born the Pastiera.

  • For the Grain:
  • 1 can Cooked Grain ( You can find it in Italian store)
  • 7 oz Sugar
  • 1-1/3 Milk and heavy cream
  • 2 oz Butter unsalted
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori d’Arancio)
  • 2 tbsp Candied Fruit
  • Cook over very low heat for 4 hours, turning often. Cook it the day before because must cool and rested
  • The Filling:
  • 21 oz. Ricotta Cheese (if you can find Sheep) sweet
  • 19 oz. Sugar
  • 5 Eggs + 2 Yolks
  • 2 tbsp Vanilla
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori di Arancio)
  • 2 cups Candied Fruit
  • Pasta Frolla Italian Sweet Pastry Dough:
  • 21 oz. Flour 00 (Cake Flour)
  • 5 oz. Sugar
  • 3 Eggs Yolk
  • 5 oz. Butter 
  • 1 pinch of Salt
  • Powdered Sugar

Not done yet:

  1. For the Pasta Frolla:
  2. In the food processor place flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Pulse several times to mix.
  3. Add butter and pulse about 10 times to mix. Add eggs and pulse until dough forms a ball.
  4. Form dough into a ball. Wrap it in plastic wrap and store in the fridge until needed, up to several days.
  5. When ready to use, unwrap it, place it on a lightly floured work surface and knead it until it is soft and malleable.
  6. Sometimes is easier to work on wax paper. In Italy the pastry is used for tarts, cakes and special cakes.
  7. For the Mix:
  8. In a large bowl mix the grain cooked the day before, the sugar with the ricotta, egg yolks, vanilla, lemon and orange extract and the candied fruit.
  9. Whip the egg whites and gently incorporate with a spatula from the bottom upwards.
  10. Roll out the dough with a rolling pin and place it on a buttered and floured baking pan.
  11. Bake for about 50 minutes at 350F. Let cool and dust with powder sugar.

Many like it when it has been cooled in the fridge for a couple of days….

I never liked the candied fruit so mine lacks it in the pie, but I do use it to perfume the milk

I also love to use heavy cream to cut the milk

I will not use margarine…

Do enjoyImage

I have found these recipes in my traditional books and I also used the pictures from cooking with Nonna.

Most of the recipes come from the pieces of papers that my mother left me and what I remembered.

Also i have found similar recipes from Cooking with Nonna and Mary Ann Espositio, 

So I am crediting these wonderful cooks… and my Mom

 

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This so traditional and I loved making it with my mother… I make a better crust than she did but the contents of this dish is still Neapoiltan

Here is the legend that goes with the Pie:

he Legends. There are different legends about the Origin of the Pastiera, one is that the priestesses of Ceres were celebrating the return of Spring. Another possibility is that they derived from ritual pie at the time of Constantine the Great, they were the offers of the baptismal ritual. But as we know the Pastiera today, it comes from the Monasteries of Naples. It was the symbol of the Resurrection on Easter. Very charming is the legend of the siren Partenope, that since she was enchanted by the beauty of the Gulf of Naples, that established there her home. She used to cheer with beautiful love songs, and one day her voice was so melodious that the residents wanted to thank for her wonderful singing. The seven most beautiful girls were responsible for delivering seven gifts to the beautiful mermaid Partenope. The flour symbol of strength and wealth of the campaign. Ricotta homage of the shepherds and sheep. The egg symbol of life. Wheat flour, boiled in to the milk, a symbol of the two kingdoms of nature. The water of orange flowers, because even the smells of the earth wanted to pay homage. The spices that represented the people far away and finally the sugar, the symbol of the sweetness of her singing in heaven, on earth, and throughout the universe. Partenope was so ‘happy with the gifts that it take them at the foot of the Gods. They were so inebriated by the smells and aromas that they decided to mix and create a dessert worthy of the beauty of the hand of Partenope. So was born the Pastiera.

  • For the Grain:
  • 1 can Cooked Grain ( You can find it in Italian store)
  • 7 oz Sugar
  • 1-1/3 Milk and heavy cream
  • 2 oz Butter unsalted
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori d’Arancio)
  • 2 tbsp Candied Fruit
  • Cook over very low heat for 4 hours, turning often. Cook it the day before because must cool and rested
  • The Filling:
  • 21 oz. Ricotta Cheese (if you can find Sheep) sweet
  • 19 oz. Sugar
  • 5 Eggs + 2 Yolks
  • 2 tbsp Vanilla
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori di Arancio)
  • 2 cups Candied Fruit
  • Pasta Frolla Italian Sweet Pastry Dough:
  • 21 oz. Flour 00 (Cake Flour)
  • 5 oz. Sugar
  • 3 Eggs Yolk
  • 5 oz. Butter 
  • 1 pinch of Salt
  • Powdered Sugar

Not done yet:

  1. For the Pasta Frolla:
  2. In the food processor place flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Pulse several times to mix.
  3. Add butter and pulse about 10 times to mix. Add eggs and pulse until dough forms a ball.
  4. Form dough into a ball. Wrap it in plastic wrap and store in the fridge until needed, up to several days.
  5. When ready to use, unwrap it, place it on a lightly floured work surface and knead it until it is soft and malleable.
  6. Sometimes is easier to work on wax paper. In Italy the pastry is used for tarts, cakes and special cakes.
  7. For the Mix:
  8. In a large bowl mix the grain cooked the day before, the sugar with the ricotta, egg yolks, vanilla, lemon and orange extract and the candied fruit.
  9. Whip the egg whites and gently incorporate with a spatula from the bottom upwards.
  10. Roll out the dough with a rolling pin and place it on a buttered and floured baking pan.
  11. Bake for about 50 minutes at 350F. Let cool and dust with powder sugar.

Many like it when it has been cooled in the fridge for a couple of days….

I never liked the candied fruit so mine lacks it in the pie, but I do use it to perfume the milk

I also love to use heavy cream to cut the milk

I will not use margarine…

Do enjoyImage

 

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This so traditional and I loved making it with my mother… I make a better crust than she did but the contents of this dish is still Neapoiltan

Here is the legend that goes with the Pie:

he Legends. There are different legends about the Origin of the Pastiera, one is that the priestesses of Ceres were celebrating the return of Spring. Another possibility is that they derived from ritual pie at the time of Constantine the Great, they were the offers of the baptismal ritual. But as we know the Pastiera today, it comes from the Monasteries of Naples. It was the symbol of the Resurrection on Easter. Very charming is the legend of the siren Partenope, that since she was enchanted by the beauty of the Gulf of Naples, that established there her home. She used to cheer with beautiful love songs, and one day her voice was so melodious that the residents wanted to thank for her wonderful singing. The seven most beautiful girls were responsible for delivering seven gifts to the beautiful mermaid Partenope. The flour symbol of strength and wealth of the campaign. Ricotta homage of the shepherds and sheep. The egg symbol of life. Wheat flour, boiled in to the milk, a symbol of the two kingdoms of nature. The water of orange flowers, because even the smells of the earth wanted to pay homage. The spices that represented the people far away and finally the sugar, the symbol of the sweetness of her singing in heaven, on earth, and throughout the universe. Partenope was so ‘happy with the gifts that it take them at the foot of the Gods. They were so inebriated by the smells and aromas that they decided to mix and create a dessert worthy of the beauty of the hand of Partenope. So was born the Pastiera.

  • For the Grain:
  • 1 can Cooked Grain ( You can find it in Italian store)
  • 7 oz Sugar
  • 1-1/3 Milk and heavy cream
  • 2 oz Butter unsalted
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori d’Arancio)
  • 2 tbsp Candied Fruit
  • Cook over very low heat for 4 hours, turning often. Cook it the day before because must cool and rested
  • The Filling:
  • 21 oz. Ricotta Cheese (if you can find Sheep) sweet
  • 19 oz. Sugar
  • 5 Eggs + 2 Yolks
  • 2 tbsp Vanilla
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori di Arancio)
  • 2 cups Candied Fruit
  • Pasta Frolla Italian Sweet Pastry Dough:
  • 21 oz. Flour 00 (Cake Flour)
  • 5 oz. Sugar
  • 3 Eggs Yolk
  • 5 oz. Butter 
  • 1 pinch of Salt
  • Powdered Sugar

Not done yet:

  1. For the Pasta Frolla:
  2. In the food processor place flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Pulse several times to mix.
  3. Add butter and pulse about 10 times to mix. Add eggs and pulse until dough forms a ball.
  4. Form dough into a ball. Wrap it in plastic wrap and store in the fridge until needed, up to several days.
  5. When ready to use, unwrap it, place it on a lightly floured work surface and knead it until it is soft and malleable.
  6. Sometimes is easier to work on wax paper. In Italy the pastry is used for tarts, cakes and special cakes.
  7. For the Mix:
  8. In a large bowl mix the grain cooked the day before, the sugar with the ricotta, egg yolks, vanilla, lemon and orange extract and the candied fruit.
  9. Whip the egg whites and gently incorporate with a spatula from the bottom upwards.
  10. Roll out the dough with a rolling pin and place it on a buttered and floured baking pan.
  11. Bake for about 50 minutes at 350F. Let cool and dust with powder sugar.

Many like it when it has been cooled in the fridge for a couple of days….

I never liked the candied fruit so mine lacks it in the pie, but I do use it to perfume the milk

I also love to use heavy cream to cut the milk

I will not use margarine…

Do enjoyImage

 

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Italian Easter Bread Gurrugulo – Scarcella

  • 1 Lb – Flour
  • 9 Eggs
  • 1 Cup – Sugar
  • 3/4 Cup – Olive oil
  • 2 Tsp – Baking powder
  • 1 Lemon

recipe image 1)

In a bowl, add the flour, 4 eggs, sugar, olive oil, baking powder and the zest of one lemon.

recipe image 2) Cut the mix in four equal parts (1 for each Gurrugulo). Take one part, divide it in three equal parts and roll each part into a strip about 1/2 thick.
recipe image 3) Take the three strips, unite them at one end and slowly and carefully braid them until the very end. Unite the two ends and on top of the union place an egg. Roll two very thin strips of the mix and place them over the egg in a cross fashion. The strips will hold the egg down. During the braiding process, if the strips are too soft or too sticky add some flour to facilitate the process.
recipe image 4) Beat one egg and with your finger wet the entire surface of the Gurrugulo. Add sprinkles of the color desired and bake for 20 mins. at 400F.
  • Sprinkles Image
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Easter Bread

Easter Bread

I grew up making this bread with my Mom. I remember as a little girl how wonderful it tasted to me. My mom did not have the best ricette, but I knew where to find a traditional recipe

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Carnevale

I love this time of the year. Yes just before Lent. The best Italian pastries come out. For some French and/Austrian cultures have delicious pastries. This is true but Italian pastries are delicious and tasty. They use a great deal of fruit. Cherries( le ciliege) are my favorite fruit topping. I also love the Italian creme ( la crema). The special dough for the famous zeppole is known as a pasta choux. The pastry is so light and delicate. It reminded me of a French pastry treat “Brioche”. I do love many of the french pastries, especially granache. Yummy. But that is another topic.

Here are these fried” rags” are wonderful, crunchy, and satisfying.

Here is the link Don’t get frightened, the recipes explanation is in English but I think the Italians are doing great with televised food shows. They are into their own Food network/channel…  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKnnDEm3zqE

Chiacchiere 5 cups of flour; 1/2 cup of grappa or some nice liqueur of your choice( some of the cooks added vodka and a little milk);    1/8 or a pinch of salt;   1 and 1/2 tsp; of baking powder;  1tsp vanilla; 3 eggs + 1 yolk; 1/3 cup of sugar;  3 and1/2 tbs of butter;  peanut oil for frying; I use canola oil it is lighter than peanut oil.

Preparation: In a large bowl put the flour and the baking powder; Add all of the other ingredients add the salt first, sugar, butter, liqueur, and the eggs. mix by hand and mix until it is all been incorporated. The dough should be smooth. Place on a work top that has been lightly floured and knead the dough for about 5 to 10 minutes.  The dough should be completely mixed and  smooth. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap for about 30 minutes in a cool place but not the fridge.  After the dough is rested divide it into 3 equal pieces.  When you use one of the pieces, keep the other pieces wrapped. The dough can easily dry out.

You will to have a pasta machine to roll out the dough. there are 3 settings on the machine.

you roll the first piece in the larger roller width. Roll it twice, then go to the second size,  cut the dough in half, intermediate 2 X; then the final roller width 2 twice.  Make sure there are no holes after it goes through the rollers. if that does happen re-roll the dough and start again; with a sharp knife cut the dough into squares then cut slits into the dough.  Heat the oil to 350 degrees, the dough will float to the top of the oil.  sprinkle with confectioner sugar and eat Yummy…

I hope I have helped you make one of my favorite Lenten treats..

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Back finally, one of the most important items about Italian-American food prepartion is how we have recreated the old dishes. I love this dish. I do not always like to have my pasta with tomato sauce all the time. I love this because it is a dish dedicated to St. Joseph. The Sicilians who created this dish to honor St. Joseph who is the patron saint of the people and the island. St. Joseph’s Day is a big Feast for Italians because in the Middle Ages, God, through St. Joseph’s intercessions, saved the Sicilians from a very serious drought. So in his honor, the custom is for all to wear red, in the same way that green is worn on St. Patrick’s Day.

Here is a recipe that I found and have used for many times and I hope that you enjoy it: I do not add the sardines which is an option.

Directions:

  1. Prepare your favorite Spaghetti noodles and set aside.
  2. In a large or deep frying pan add the olive oil, crushed garlic clove and bread crumbs and fry until golden brown.
  3. Next add the cooked pasta into your frying pan, warm and toss contents until well coated.
  4. Plate and sprinkle with parmesan cheese.

Read more: http://www.food.com/recipe/pasta-with-bread-crumbs-la-pasta-con-le-briciole-di-pane-455081#ixzz1ku6rQc4g

Enjoy…

MJ

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