Food is so much a part of my life

I am doing some research regarding different cooking styles of basic casa lingua recipes.

A very famous dish is one that is know as La Genovese.  This dish is a purely a beautiful rich meat sauce that combines pasta with the meat sauce. The history of this dish is a mystery. It is Neapolitan. One of the really authentic dishes that shows the innovation and creativity in cooking of Naples. It is a not a dish from Genoa but it is strictly a Neapolitan dish. I remember my Aunts making is. It was time consuming dish to prepare but it was such a pleasure to put each morsel into your mouth.  Yummy…

I guess I had some extra onions around and a nice cut of  beef, sirloin.  So with a little ingenuity I attempted to remember what I saw when my aunt was making the dish and a recipe from one of my cook books. I love braising meat. I have another recipe that I learned from Guiliano Hazan, son of Marcela Hazan, she was one of the first Italians to write an authentic cooking book using American ingredients and the Italian know how.

I pinned Mario’s recipe on my Pinboard. Image

 

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Food is so much a part of my life

I am doing some research regarding different cooking styles of basic casa lingua recipes.

A very famous dish is one that is know as La Genovese.  This dish is a purely a beautiful rich meat sauce that combines pasta with the meat sauce. The history of this dish is a mystery. It is Neapolitan. One of the really authentic dishes that shows the innovation and creativity in cooking of Naples. It is a not a dish from Genoa but it is strictly a Neapolitan dish. I remember my Aunts making is. It was time consuming dish to prepare but it was such a pleasure to put each morsel into your mouth.  Yummy…

I guess I had some extra onions around and a nice cut of  beef, sirloin.  So with a little ingenuity I attempted to remember what I saw when my aunt was making the dish and a recipe from one of my cook books. I love braising meat. I have another recipe that I learned from Guiliano Hazan, son of Marcela Hazan, she was one of the first Italians to write an authentic cooking book using American ingredients and the Italian know how.

I pinned Mario’s recipe on my Pinboard. Image

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Food is so much a part of my life

I am doing some research regarding different cooking styles of basic casa lingua recipes.

A very famous dish is one that is know as La Genovese.  This dish is a purely a beautiful rich meat sauce that combines pasta with the meat sauce. The history of this dish is a mystery. It is Neapolitan. One of the really authentic dishes that shows the innovation and creativity in cooking of Naples. It is a not a dish from Genoa but it is strictly a Neapolitan dish. I remember my Aunts making is. It was time consuming dish to prepare but it was such a pleasure to put each morsel into your mouth.  Yummy…

I guess I had some extra onions around and a nice cut of  beef, sirloin.  So with a little ingenuity I attempted to remember what I saw when my aunt was making the dish and a recipe from one of my cook books. I love braising meat. I have another recipe that I learned from Guiliano Hazan, son of Marcela Hazan, she was one of the first Italians to write an authentic cooking book using American ingredients and the Italian know how.

I pinned Mario’s recipe on my Pinboard. 

 

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La Genovese

La Genovese

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Eggplant a Much Loved Italian vegetable

Eggplant is the stable for many Italian and Italian American households. I have had them filled with ricotta, ricotta and prosciutto, mozzarella, and also chopped meat. Calabrese love eggplant.  The Calabrese cook it in many different. I remember one night instead of having pizza and to make sure that we ate the eggplant in the fridge, Mom cut the eggplants in half, scored the pulp , season with finely chopped garlic, salt, pepper, olive oil, and smeared a thin layer of tomato sauce. Into the oven for about 10 – 15 minutes at 400 degrees. I would also add parmigiana cheese and mozzarella toward the last 4 minutes. The meal was heaven and a wonderful opportunity to savor eggplant in another way!

Enjoy Don’t order pizza tonight, have an eggplant!

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This so traditional and I loved making it with my mother… I make a better crust than she did but the contents of this dish is still Neapolitan

Here is the legend that goes with the Pie:

The Legends. There are different legends about the Origin of the Pastiera, one is that the priestesses of Ceres were celebrating the return of Spring. Another possibility is that they derived from ritual pie at the time of Constantine the Great, they were the offers of the baptismal ritual. But as we know the Pastiera today, it comes from the Monasteries of Naples. It was the symbol of the Resurrection on Easter. Very charming is the legend of the siren Partenope, that since she was enchanted by the beauty of the Gulf of Naples, that established there her home. She used to cheer with beautiful love songs, and one day her voice was so melodious that the residents wanted to thank for her wonderful singing. The seven most beautiful girls were responsible for delivering seven gifts to the beautiful mermaid Partenope. The flour symbol of strength and wealth of the campaign. Ricotta homage of the shepherds and sheep. The egg symbol of life. Wheat flour, boiled in to the milk, a symbol of the two kingdoms of nature. The water of orange flowers, because even the smells of the earth wanted to pay homage. The spices that represented the people far away and finally the sugar, the symbol of the sweetness of her singing in heaven, on earth, and throughout the universe. Partenope was so ‘happy with the gifts that it take them at the foot of the Gods. They were so inebriated by the smells and aromas that they decided to mix and create a dessert worthy of the beauty of the hand of Partenope. So was born the Pastiera.

  • For the Grain:
  • 1 can Cooked Grain ( You can find it in Italian store)
  • 7 oz Sugar
  • 1-1/3 Milk and heavy cream
  • 2 oz Butter unsalted
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori d’Arancio)
  • 2 tbsp Candied Fruit
  • Cook over very low heat for 4 hours, turning often. Cook it the day before because must cool and rested
  • The Filling:
  • 21 oz. Ricotta Cheese (if you can find Sheep) sweet
  • 19 oz. Sugar
  • 5 Eggs + 2 Yolks
  • 2 tbsp Vanilla
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori di Arancio)
  • 2 cups Candied Fruit
  • Pasta Frolla Italian Sweet Pastry Dough:
  • 21 oz. Flour 00 (Cake Flour)
  • 5 oz. Sugar
  • 3 Eggs Yolk
  • 5 oz. Butter
  • 1 pinch of Salt
  • Powdered Sugar

Not done yet:

  1. For the Pasta Frolla:
  2. In the food processor place flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Pulse several times to mix.
  3. Add butter and pulse about 10 times to mix. Add eggs and pulse until dough forms a ball.
  4. Form dough into a ball. Wrap it in plastic wrap and store in the fridge until needed, up to several days.
  5. When ready to use, unwrap it, place it on a lightly floured work surface and knead it until it is soft and malleable.
  6. Sometimes is easier to work on wax paper. In Italy the pastry is used for tarts, cakes and special cakes.
  7. For the Mix:
  8. In a large bowl mix the grain cooked the day before, the sugar with the ricotta, egg yolks, vanilla, lemon and orange extract and the candied fruit.
  9. Whip the egg whites and gently incorporate with a spatula from the bottom upwards.
  10. Roll out the dough with a rolling pin and place it on a buttered and floured baking pan.
  11. Bake for about 50 minutes at 350F. Let cool and dust with powder sugar.

Many like it when it has been cooled in the fridge for a couple of days….

I never liked the candied fruit so mine lacks it in the pie, but I do use it to perfume the milk

I also love to use heavy cream to cut the milk

I will not use margarine…

Do enjoy

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This so traditional and I loved making it with my mother… I make a better crust than she did but the contents of this dish is still Neapoiltan

Here is the legend that goes with the Pie:

he Legends. There are different legends about the Origin of the Pastiera, one is that the priestesses of Ceres were celebrating the return of Spring. Another possibility is that they derived from ritual pie at the time of Constantine the Great, they were the offers of the baptismal ritual. But as we know the Pastiera today, it comes from the Monasteries of Naples. It was the symbol of the Resurrection on Easter. Very charming is the legend of the siren Partenope, that since she was enchanted by the beauty of the Gulf of Naples, that established there her home. She used to cheer with beautiful love songs, and one day her voice was so melodious that the residents wanted to thank for her wonderful singing. The seven most beautiful girls were responsible for delivering seven gifts to the beautiful mermaid Partenope. The flour symbol of strength and wealth of the campaign. Ricotta homage of the shepherds and sheep. The egg symbol of life. Wheat flour, boiled in to the milk, a symbol of the two kingdoms of nature. The water of orange flowers, because even the smells of the earth wanted to pay homage. The spices that represented the people far away and finally the sugar, the symbol of the sweetness of her singing in heaven, on earth, and throughout the universe. Partenope was so ‘happy with the gifts that it take them at the foot of the Gods. They were so inebriated by the smells and aromas that they decided to mix and create a dessert worthy of the beauty of the hand of Partenope. So was born the Pastiera.

  • For the Grain:
  • 1 can Cooked Grain ( You can find it in Italian store)
  • 7 oz Sugar
  • 1-1/3 Milk and heavy cream
  • 2 oz Butter unsalted
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori d’Arancio)
  • 2 tbsp Candied Fruit
  • Cook over very low heat for 4 hours, turning often. Cook it the day before because must cool and rested
  • The Filling:
  • 21 oz. Ricotta Cheese (if you can find Sheep) sweet
  • 19 oz. Sugar
  • 5 Eggs + 2 Yolks
  • 2 tbsp Vanilla
  • 2 tbsp Lemon and Orange Extract (Acqua di Fiori di Arancio)
  • 2 cups Candied Fruit
  • Pasta Frolla Italian Sweet Pastry Dough:
  • 21 oz. Flour 00 (Cake Flour)
  • 5 oz. Sugar
  • 3 Eggs Yolk
  • 5 oz. Butter 
  • 1 pinch of Salt
  • Powdered Sugar

Not done yet:

  1. For the Pasta Frolla:
  2. In the food processor place flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Pulse several times to mix.
  3. Add butter and pulse about 10 times to mix. Add eggs and pulse until dough forms a ball.
  4. Form dough into a ball. Wrap it in plastic wrap and store in the fridge until needed, up to several days.
  5. When ready to use, unwrap it, place it on a lightly floured work surface and knead it until it is soft and malleable.
  6. Sometimes is easier to work on wax paper. In Italy the pastry is used for tarts, cakes and special cakes.
  7. For the Mix:
  8. In a large bowl mix the grain cooked the day before, the sugar with the ricotta, egg yolks, vanilla, lemon and orange extract and the candied fruit.
  9. Whip the egg whites and gently incorporate with a spatula from the bottom upwards.
  10. Roll out the dough with a rolling pin and place it on a buttered and floured baking pan.
  11. Bake for about 50 minutes at 350F. Let cool and dust with powder sugar.

Many like it when it has been cooled in the fridge for a couple of days….

I never liked the candied fruit so mine lacks it in the pie, but I do use it to perfume the milk

I also love to use heavy cream to cut the milk

I will not use margarine…

Do enjoyImage

I have found these recipes in my traditional books and I also used the pictures from cooking with Nonna.

Most of the recipes come from the pieces of papers that my mother left me and what I remembered.

Also i have found similar recipes from Cooking with Nonna and Mary Ann Espositio, 

So I am crediting these wonderful cooks… and my Mom

 

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